Several months ago, we looked at a few of the tools Product Managers can take advantage of to increase productivity and streamline processes. While tools are great for improving upon already solid processes, unfortunately they will not fix underlying issues and efficiency-sappers. Consider these 4 ways you could be sabotaging your success, as well as how these issues can be reversed.

 

Sticking to the Roadmap Instead of the Reality

Product management is more art than science, so staying flexible and adapting to the flow of a project is necessary. Initial predictions of time, budget, and other factors are just that – predictions. They will likely require tweaking during the course of the project, so staying flexible and communicating changes will go a long way in the overall success of the product development lifecycle.

Taking on Too Many Projects

Sure, there may be a dozen or more product feature requests on your desk. Each one seems pressing, and each requester, whether internal or external, believes theirs is top priority. Keep your product development pipeline focused and cut the clutter in order to deliver results, not promises. Regularly communicating development goals and progress is an important way to keep your team updated on what has already been accomplished and what is in the works.

Loading Up on Product Features

The “less is more” adage often holds true in developing products that consumers love. Consider the fact that some of the most popular products and brands rely on simplicity and ease of use to attract customers. Bulking up an elegant product with more and more features often results in diminishing returns, and users may start to see less value as new components are tacked on. Zero in on the existing value of the product and remember to add only the features that support that value.

Fearing Failure

Flexibility is not only key throughout the course of an individual project – it matters at the end, whether the result is positive or negative. Not being tethered to the idea of success the first time around allows for the freedom of learning valuable lessons from each development experience.